LLEVAR+gerund and LLEVAR SIN+infinitive

March 12, 2015

 

The verb “llevar” is very common and very useful. It has a lot of different meanings and constructions.

 

Today we are going to learn how to use llevar + gerund and llevar sin + infinitive in time expressions. As you will see is very much easier to use these constructions than the literal translation since you don´t need to use the present perfect but only the present tense.

 

LLEVAR + GERUND:  it expresses how long you have been doing something

 

Llevo estudiando español dos años. I have been studying Spanish for two years.

 

You can place the period of time anywhere in the sentence but after the verb “llevar”.

 

I have been studying Spanish for two years.

Llevo dos años estudiando español.

Llevo estudiando español dos años.

Llevo estudiando dos años español (a little bit less common)

 

She has been working here for four months.

Lleva cuatro meses trabajando aquí.

Lleva trabajando aquí cuatro meses.

Lleva trabajando cuatro meses aquí (a little bit less common)

 

*We recommend the two first forms.

 

NOTE: “llevar + gerund” construction usually omits the gerund when the main verb is “estar”.

 

He has been married for twenty years.

Lleva veinte años casado

Lleva veinte años estando casado (it doesn´t sound good)

 

How long have you been here?

¿Cuánto tiempo llevas aquí?

¿Cuánto tiempo llevas estando aquí? (it doesn´t sound good)

 

LLEVAR SIN + INFINITIVE: it expresses how long you have not done something

 

I haven´t studied Spanish for two days.

Llevo dos días sin estudiar español.

Llevo sin estudiar español dos días.

Llevo sin estudiar dos días español (less common)

 

She hasn´t worked here for two weeks.

Lleva dos semanas sin trabajar aquí.

Lleva sin trabajar aquí dos semanas.

Lleva sin trabajar dos semanas aquí (less common)

*We recommend the two first forms.

 

*NOTE: Remember there are also another ways to express how long you have been doing something or how long you have been without doing something using the present tense with “hace” and “desde hace”.

 

Hace dos años que estudio español.

Hace dos años que no estudio español.

Estudio español desde hace dos años.

No estudio español desde hace dos años.

Please reload

Featured Posts

Saber vs Conocer

January 17, 2014

1/1
Please reload

Recent Posts

July 12, 2018

July 11, 2015

June 18, 2015

Please reload

SpanishSkype.org - All rights reserved

Privacy Policy